Heidelberg Catechism: Lord's Day #15

Intro…

Welcome to the Cornerstone Baptist church podcast. My name is Justin Wheeler, I am the preaching pastor for Cornerstone and today we are in week 15 of our journey through the Heidelberg Catechism and I will be talking to you today about questions 37, 38 & 39.

Transition

When you think about all the things that Jesus did on earth what comes to mind? First of all, He lived. He was conceived in miraculous fashion by the Holy Spirit in the womb of the virgin Mary. But when He was born, he was born like any other human child. He lived in the home of His mother and earthly father, Joseph. He grew up alongside the other kids in his village.

He went to synagogue like everyone else. He was taught like everyone else. As He grew older, He stepped out of the background and into the foreground for all to see. He began to teach amazing truths that no one had ever heard before. He began to do amazing things that no one had ever seen before.

John wrote that if all the stories of Jesus’ miracles were written down, there wouldn’t be enough paper to record them all. He lived a remarkably full life, but one third of all that is written about Him in the gospels records only the final week leading up to His death, burial and resurrection. In the gospel of Luke alone, 33 years of Jesus life was covered in the first 18 chapters. The last 6 chapters covered one week.

What does this tell us? It tells us that one of the most important things that we need to know about Jesus is what we learn through His death and that is the focus on this week’s questions in the Catechism.

Lord’s Day Focus...

Question 37: What do you understand by this word suffered?

Answer: That during His whole life on earth, but especially at the end, Christ sustained in body and soul the anger of God against the sin of the whole human race. This He did in order that, by His suffering as the only atoning sacrifice, He might set us free, body and soul, from eternal condemnation, and gain for us God’s grace, righteousness, and eternal life.  

The answer to question 37 begins by pointing out that all of Jesus’ life was suffering. One of the main authors of the Heidelberg wrote a commentary that included seven ways that Christ suffered.

1. He gave up the joys of Heaven

2. He experienced the infirmities of our nature (hunger, thirst, sadness, grief)

3. He knew deprivation and poverty (having nowhere to lay His head)

4. He endured insults, treacheries, slanders, blasphemies, rejection, and contempt

5. He faced temptations from the Devil.

6. He died a shameful and painful death

7. He experienced the bitter anguish of soul as one accursed of God and forsaken by His heavenly Father.[1]

Jesus suffering didn’t just occur on the cross, it was spread throughout His life but it was punctuated at the end when he died in the place of sinners to atone for our sin. In the OT prophecy of Isaiah, Jesus is referred to as the suffering servant. He poured out His soul to death in order to make an offering to God for the guilt of all those who believe.

He received in His flesh the stripes that we deserved. He was oppressed and afflicted in our place. Then in addition to the physical suffering, Jesus endured the anger of God that we deserved. No one died like He died. No one suffered like He suffered.

Oh, there were thousands who were killed on Roman crosses, but Jesus received the wrath from God that we deserved and to that point He had only ever experienced the love and delight of God. To be honest, we can’t fully understand the depth of His suffering but like the Catechism says, He endured it in order to atone for our sins.

Question 38: Why did He suffer “under Pontius Pilate” as judge?

Answer: So that He, though innocent, might be condemned by a civil judge, and so free us from the severe judgment of God that was to fall on us.

In Luke’s gospel it is recorded that Jesus was brought to Pontius Pilate to stand trial, but as Pilate questioned Jesus, he found Him innocent. In the human law court of His day Jesus was found guilty of no crime but still He was condemned to die. All of this was part of God’s plan for Jesus that would result in our freedom from sin.

The Jewish legal system is believed by many to have been the most carefully outlined system of law in the entire ancient world. The foundation for this system of law was God Himself. He gave laws to His people because He wanted them to be a just nation and to display that justice to the world. God commanded Israel to be a city on a hill, He wanted them to be a people who carried out justice, who loved kindness and who walked humbly with their God (Micah 6:8).

But the precision of Jewish law did not keep them from abusing that law in order to carry out their wicked plans. Historians have made clear that Jesus’ trial was a gross miscarriage of Justice, but we don’t need historians to help us see this. In His life, Jesus did nothing but good to His fellow man, but at the end of His life He is treated like the worst kind of criminal.

Jesus healed the sick, He restored the lame, He fed the poor, He showed grace to sinners, He set free those under demonic oppression, He comforted those who grieved and on more than one occasion He did this by raising their loved ones from the dead. In His life, Jesus went about doing good and the leaders of Israel repay Him with cruelty and pain.

As His trial got underway, He was held in custody though no crime has been committed. He was punished, literally beaten and mocked, though no guilt was proven. Punishment was carried out before any verdict was handed down.

But all of this took place to show us something, that Jesus the truly innocent sufferer was taking our place.

1 Peter 2:21 Christ suffered for you…22 He committed no sin, neither was deceit found in his mouth. 23 When he was reviled, he did not revile in return; when he suffered, he did not threaten, but continued entrusting himself to him who judges justly.

 

Question 39: Is it significant that He was crucified instead of dying some other way?

Answer: Yes. This death convinces me that He shouldered the curse which lay on me, since death by crucifixion was accursed by God.

The answer here is really a reference to what the Apostle Paul writes in Galatians 3:13.

Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us—for it is written, “Cursed is everyone who is hanged on a tree”[2]

Again, the point is to show us how Jesus took our place. His suffering was for the benefit of those who believe. He suffered so that we could go free. He was treated unjustly so that we could receive pardon. He became a curse for us so that we wouldn’t have to bear the curse ourselves. All of this gives us confidence that Jesus’ death wasn’t the result of His sin but the result of ours and if He died for our sin, the payment has been made and we are free because of Christ.

God’s wrath is very real and it is very just and our only hope of being freed from it is on account of what Christ has done on the cross.

When Jesus Christ did His work on the cross it served to accomplish two things: (1) to remove our guilt because His blood and death paid our ransom, and (2) to satisfy God’s wrath and restore us in relationship to God. Because of our faith in Christ we do not stand before the judge as an enemy but as a friend, a son or daughter whose pardon has already been paid in full.

And we can now sing again…

“My sin, oh the bliss, of this glorious thought, my sin, not in part, but the whole…was nailed to the cross and I bear it no more, praise the Lord, Praise the Lord, it is well with my soul.”

Thanks for joining me today as I discuss the Heidelberg Catechism. I hope you’ll join me again next week as we look at Lord’s Day 16 together and discuss questions 40 thru 44.

Conclusion…

If you want to learn more about Cornerstone Baptist church, you can find us online at Cornerstonewylie.org. You can follow us on Twitter or Instagram @cbcwylie. You can find us on Facebook at facebook.com/cornerstonewylie. You can also subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or google play to stay up to date on all the new content.

Thanks for listening.


[1] The Commentary of Dr. Zacharias Ursinus, translated by G.W. Williard, 231

[2] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2016). (Ga 3:13). Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.

Heidelberg Catechism: Lord's Day #14

Intro…

Welcome to the Cornerstone Baptist church podcast. My name is Justin Wheeler, I am the preaching pastor for Cornerstone and today we are in week 14 of our journey through the Heidelberg Catechism and I will be talking to you today about questions 35 & 36.

Transition

Our questions for this week are still focused on Jesus but also on the role the Holy Spirit in Jesus’ conception. The questions focus on Mary’s role in Jesus’ birth and what it means that she was a virgin. Finally, question 36 presses us to think and understand what Jesus’ unique and miraculous conception, and virgin birth have to do with us, with our Christian faith. Turns out, quite a bit actually.

Lord’s Day Focus...

Question 35: What does it mean that He “was conceived by the Holy Spirit and born of the virgin Mary?”

Answer: That the eternal Son of God, who is and remains true and eternal God, took to Himself, through the working of the Holy Spirit, from the flesh and blood of the virgin Mary, a truly human nature so that He might become David’s true descendant, like His brothers in every way except for sin.

Among the miracles that highlight the life and ministry of Christ, none are more awesome than His incarnation and His resurrection. Easter morning is something we celebrate every year, actually we celebrate it every week when we gather for worship on the Lord’s Day. Resurrection refers to Christ being made alive even though he had been dead. He went into the grave on Friday and rose to life on Sunday; this miracle has forever changed the world.

But the incarnation is no less awesome. Incarnation refers to the eternal son of God taking on flesh and being conceived in the womb of a young, virgin girl named Mary. God has become a man and this truth is found all over the New Testament.

Phil 2:5 Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men.

We also have the accounts of Jesus’ birth, from Matthew 1 and Luke 1-2. I won’t read through these passages, but you should as you work to understand and memorize the catechism this week. These birth narratives are familiar to most of us, not least because we read through them nearly every year around Christmas time. These passages make clear that Jesus’ conception and birth did not occur in the ordinary way.

Both Matthew and Luke tell us of how an angel of the Lord came to a young virgin girl named Mary. Mary was engaged to be married to a man named Joseph but before the marriage took place and well before they had a chance to consummate their union with sexual intercourse, an angel brought Mary a message. He told her that she would bear in her womb the Son of the Most High and when she asked, “How will this happen?” The angel told her that the child would be conceived in her womb by the Holy Spirit.

This teaching has been a staple of Christian doctrine for 2,000 years. It is explicit in the gospel accounts and while some have tried to dismiss it or argue it away; this miracle remains a critical part of our faith. We have no idea how it happened, but we have countless Biblical reasons to believe that it did happen.

We even have Old Testament prophetic texts that point forward to the virgin conception of the Messiah. In Isaiah 7:14 we read, “Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign. Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.”

Some have dismissed the virgin birth as mythological. Some have dismissed it as impossible. Some have dismissed it as unimportant. None of these is true but all of these are inter-related. Let me explain. The gospel accounts of Jesus’ divine conception read like the rest of the NT (historical narrative) and nothing like religious mythology. Mary’s encounter took place and the account was circulated while she was still alive and could confirm that the story was true, not made up or embellished to start a religion.

The virgin birth is naturally speaking, impossible; but since when has anything been impossible for God. By the way, the word miracle implies naturally impossible. A miracle implies that the supernatural has invaded the natural world. You may not be able to explain it, science may not be able to test for it, but a miracle of God doesn’t require either of those.

The virgin birth is also one of the most important truths of the Christian faith, such that if you take it away the whole thing falls apart. Here I want to quote from Kevin DeYoung again,

The virgin birth demonstrates that Jesus was truly human and truly divine. If Jesus had not been born of a human, we could not believe in His full humanity. But if His birth were like any other human birth – through the union of a human father and mother – we would question His full divinity. The virgin birth is necessary to secure both real human nature and a completely divine human nature.[1]

But why? Why is it necessary for both of these things to be true?

Question 36: How does the holy conception and birth of Christ benefit you?

Answer: He is our mediator, and with His innocence and perfect holiness He removes from God’s sight my sin – mine since I was conceived.

Christ took our flesh upon him so that he might take our sins upon him. In order for man to have peace with God a man must pay the price. Christ maintained his deity because only a perfect Son could fulfill the righteous requirements of God. Only one who is fully God and truly man could bring peace between God and man.

He alone is qualified to remove our sin and bring us to God clothed in His perfect righteousness. So I guess we could say that the virgin birth is not only important but essential to our salvation and faith.

Thanks for joining me today as I discuss the Heidelberg Catechism. I hope you’ll join me again next week as we look at Lord’s Day 15 together and discuss questions 37, 38 & 39.

Conclusion…

If you want to learn more about Cornerstone Baptist church, you can find us online at Cornerstonewylie.org. You can follow us on Twitter or Instagram @cbcwylie. You can find us on Facebook at facebook.com/cornerstonewylie. You can also subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or google play to stay up to date on all the new content.

Thanks for listening.


[1] Kevin DeYoung The Good News We Almost Forgot (pg. 78)

Heidelberg Catechism: Lord's Day #13

Heidelberg Catechism: Lord's Day #13

Intro…

Welcome to the Cornerstone Baptist church podcast. My name is Justin Wheeler, I am the preaching pastor for Cornerstone and today we are in week 13 of our journey through the Heidelberg Catechism and I will be talking to you today about questions 33 & 34.

Transition

Over the last couple of weeks, we have been working our way through the section that focuses on Jesus, which is one of the largest sections in the catechism. Questions 29-52 all deal with who Jesus is and what He has done. This section takes the statement on Jesus in the Apostles Creed and goes through it one section at a time to explain what we read in that creed. So, let’s refresh our memories as to what the AC said about Jesus.

I believe in Jesus Christ, His only begotten Son, our Lord; Who was conceived by the Holy Ghost and born of the Virgin Mary. He Suffered under Pontius Pilate; was crucified, died, and was buried; He descended to hell. The third day He rose again from the dead. He ascended to heaven and is seated at the right hand of God the Father Almighty. From there He will come to judge the living and the dead.

Last week, in questions 31 & 32, we looked at what it means that the Jesus is called the Christ and that we are called Christians. This week we will discuss what it means that Jesus is the only begotten Son of God and our Lord.

Lord’s Day Focus...

Question 33: Why is He called God’s “only son” when we are also God’s children?

Answer: Because Christ alone is the eternal, natural Son of God. We, however, are adopted children of God – adopted by grace through Christ.

The way that the Heidelberg answers this question has to do with the difference between Jesus as the natural Son of God, while we as believers are the adopted children of God. Of course, we know that there are great similarities between adopted and natural children. They are both part of the family, they are both loved, accepted and cared for, they are both entitled to family inheritance, and they both enjoy the relationship to their parents.

But there are also significant differences between the two. Adopted children were not always part of the family, they had to be made part of the family. By birth, they were part of another family and for one reason or another they are no longer part of that family. That’s where adoption comes in. Another family chooses to love them, to bring them home, to care for them and to make them part of the new family.

Let’s carry this analogy over as we think about the difference between Jesus’ status as the only natural Son of God and our status adopted children of God. Jesus has always been the Son of His Father. According to John 1, Philippians 2:5-10, Colossians 1:15-20, and Hebrews 1:1-3; Jesus has been the Son of God for eternity. There has never been a time in the history of…ever, that Jesus was not the Son of God.

The Sonship of Jesus Christ, then, is different from ours in that we became the children of God, whereas Jesus Christ has always been God’s Son. Jesus was not made the Son of God at His incarnation as if some new title or identity was conferred upon Him. The Son of God was the Son of the Father even before creation. His Sonship is eternal. Ours is not. That’s the difference.[1]

Jesus did not become the Son of God by being born to the Father by virtue of Mary. He was already the Son of God. The Father did not give Jesus life in the same sense in which our natural parents give us life at conception. It is mysterious, but the Bible nevertheless tells us that Jesus is One with God, co-eternal with God, united in essence yet unique in His person as the Son of the Father, the only Begotten Son of the Father.

We on the other hand, were not born as children of God, but were actually born in our sin as children of another father, the Devil. According to Ephesians 2:2-3, we are by nature children of wrath because of our sin and that is how we were born. In order to become children of God we must be adopted and in order for our adoption to be ratified we need a Savior.

Gal 4:4 When the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.

In order for us to be made the children of God we needed to be ransomed from our natural state of being an enemy of God. We needed a Redeemer to come and pay the price for our freedom, the price was His blood, and we needed a Father, The Father, to come and accept that ransom and receive us as adopted children.

That’s the difference. Jesus has always been the Only Begotten Son of God while we have become the ransomed, redeemed, and adopted children of God by faith in the work of Jesus.

Next question…

Question 34: Why do you call Him “Our Lord?”

Answer: Because – not with gold or silver, but with precious blood – He has set us free from sin and the tyranny of the devil, and has bought us, body and soul, to be His very own.

The Greek term kurios means master in most cases and it is often used to describe the master, in a master slave relationship. But this term is also used in the Greek translation of the Old Testament and it is used to refer to God Himself. In Exodus 34 when God descended in the cloud to stand before Moses and proclaimed His name to Moses we see this term used.

The Lord passed before him and proclaimed, “The Lord, the Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty…

In one sense, when we call Jesus our Lord, we are declaring Him to be God over us. He is our master and He has every right to that title because He gave His life to set us free. Jesus came to earth on a rescue mission, to save us, body and soul, and to make us His own. He accomplished our rescue when He laid down His life in our place. Therefore, not only is He lord in the sense that He is God in the flesh, but He is our Lord in the sense that He has purchased us with His blood.

Christ, according to Ursinus, can claim lordship over our lives for four reasons: by right of creation (He made us), by right of redemption (He saved us), by reason of preservation (He keeps us), and with respect to ordination and appointment (God has declared Him Lord over all).

Jesus right to rule us as our Lord is well-founded. But He also rules as Lord over all of creation. We may not see that rule in effect today, but one day we will.

Phil 2:9  God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, 10 so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, 11 and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

Thanks for joining me today as I discuss the Heidelberg Catechism. I hope you’ll join me again next week as we look at Lord’s Day 14 together and discuss questions 35 & 36.

Conclusion…

If you want to learn more about Cornerstone Baptist church, you can find us online at Cornerstonewylie.org. You can follow us on Twitter or Instagram @cbcwylie. You can find us on Facebook at facebook.com/cornerstonewylie. You can also subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or google play to stay up to date on all the new content.

Thanks for listening.


[1] Kevin DeYoung The Good News We Almost Forgot (Pg. 71)

Heidelberg Catechism: Lord's Day #12

Intro…

Welcome to the Cornerstone Baptist church podcast. My name is Justin Wheeler, I am the preaching pastor for Cornerstone and today we are in week 12 of our journey through the Heidelberg Catechism and I will be talking to you today about questions 31 & 32.

Transition

Last week we began the section on Jesus and this is one of the largest sections in the catechism. Questions 29-52 all deal with who Jesus is and what He has done. This section and all the questions in it are taking cues from the Apostles Creed and the aim is to go through all the detailed phrases within the creed. So let’s refresh our memories as to what the AC said about Jesus.

I believe in Jesus Christ, His only begotten Son, our Lord; Who was conceived by the Holy Ghost and born of the Virgin Mary. He Suffered under Pontius Pilate; was crucified, died, and was buried; He descended to hell. The third day He rose again from the dead. He ascended to heaven and is seated at the right hand of God the Father Almighty. From there He will come to judge the living and the dead.

Last week, in questions 29 & 30, we looked at what it means that the Son of God is called Jesus. This week the question has to do not with his name but with His title, Christ.

Lord’s Day Focus...

Question 31: Why is He called “Christ,” meaning “Anointed?”

Answer: Because He has been ordained by God the Father and has been anointed with the Holy Spirit to be our chief prophet and teacher who perfectly reveals to us the secret counsel and will of God for our deliverance; our only high priest who has set us free by the one sacrifice of His body, and who continually pleads our cause with the Father; and our eternal king who governs us by His Word and Spirit, and who guards us and keeps us in the freedom He has won for us.

While there is much packed into this answer it is easy to spot the way, this statement is organized. It is ordered to show how Jesus fulfilled the office of Christ by fulfilling the 3 specific offices of prophet, priest and king.

In the OT, prophets, priest and king were three separate offices that God established, and these served as mediators between God and the people of God. The prophets spoke the Word of God to the people, the priest offered sacrifices, prayers and even praises to God for the people, and the king ruled over the people as a representative of God.

At times there were faithful prophets, priests, and kings; and as we know there were also wicked ones who failed in their office. But each of these offices foreshadowed the One who was to come. The One who would execute these offices with finality; that’s where Jesus comes into this discussion.

In Christ, these three offices come together and are fulfilled. As our Prophet, Jesus speaks the Word of God to us and He also reveals God to us. As our Priest, Jesus offers Himself as a sacrifice to God for us that ends all sacrifices. As our King, Jesus rules over the church and all of creation.

It was John Calvin who brought the three-fold office of Christ into prominence during the reformation. He wasn’t the first to write on it, the early church fathers and Catholic theologians referred to the work of Christ in these three distinct ways (prophet, priest and king). But Calvin set out to show how Christ not only served in these roles but did so as a means to completely satisfy our need of salvation, where the Catholic teachers left that need unfulfilled.

Calvin understood that Jesus’s fulfillment of the three-fold office was tied to His title as the Messiah or the Anointed One of God. “Under the law, prophets as well as priests and kings were anointed with holy oil. Hence, the illustrious name of “Messiah” was bestowed upon the one promised mediator,” who fulfilled all three anointed offices of the Old Testament.[1]

But another Reformed theologian, named Francis Turretin, introduced the threefold office of Christ as the divinely revealed cure to man’s threefold disease of ignorance, guilt, and pollution. Three offices to counteract man’s threefold need. Turretin taught that Christ serving in the triple office, as prophet, priest, and king, was necessary to accomplish the Triple Cure to our fatal three-fold disease.”

So let’s think for a few minutes about those three offices and how Jesus fulfilled them.

Of course, Jesus is a prophet of God, but the catechism points out that He is not simply a prophet, but the chief prophet. Jesus is the greatest of the prophets and He was also more than a prophet. He is the One prophet that all the other prophets were pointing to. He is the One prophet who fulfills all the promises and prophecies that God ever gave to His people. He is the One prophet who not only speaks the Word of God but who is the Word of God.

John 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

Jesus was not only a messenger bringing revelation from God, He was the source of revelation from God (Grudem 626). In His role as the final prophet of God, Jesus came to reveal His plan to us but in His role as the Savior of the world He also came to accomplish salvation for us. As our prophet, He not only announced an end to our sin, but He made an end to our sin.

He does more than prophecy about these good things, He has come to give us these good things. He not only preaches Good News but He makes that news Good.

Jesus is also our great and only high priest. The responsibilities of the priests included making the sacrifices and performing the ritual of the sanctuary, burning the incense along with their intercession in the Holy Place, and teaching the people the laws and the ritual (Deut. 33:9,10; Mal. 2:7). We tend to simplify their office into two categories: making sacrifices and offering intercession.

Jesus fulfills both of these. In his death on the cross, Jesus offered to God the final sacrifice for the sins of all those who believe.

Heb 10:12 When Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God…14 For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are being sanctified. 

He is the great high priest who was divinely appointed to offer the once-for-all sacrifice to atone for our sin.

But in his death, Jesus role as our only priest does not end. He rose from the dead. He is alive forever and He is with the Father in Heaven interceding on behalf of his people. He is at God’s right hand and will remain there for eternity whispering prayers in the Father’s ear on our behalf.

Jesus is also our eternal king who governs and guards us by His Spirit and His Word. As our eternal king He guards the freedom purchased for us by His sacrificial death. The king we needed was not the king we deserved. He came to die and by his death he bought our freedom. In Heaven, they sing a song about Jesus,

Rev 5:9…“Worthy are you to take the scroll and to open its seals, for you were slain, and by your blood you ransomed people for God from every tribe and language and people and nation, 10 and you have made them a kingdom and priests to our God, and they shall reign on the earth.” 

Today, Christ rules as our king from Heaven and His rule is a spiritual one. His rule is grounded in his work of redemption and all who believe in Christ are citizens of His kingdom. He rules over the church as our Savior, He reigns in the hearts of His people by the Holy Spirit, He governs His people by His Word, and the day is coming when our king will return to rule over all the earth in glory.

Which brings us to our final question for this week?

Question 32: Why are you called a Christian?

Answer: Because by faith I am a member of Christ and so I share in His anointing. I am anointed to confess His name, to present myself to Him as a living sacrifice of thanks, to strive with a good conscience against sin and the devil in this life, and afterward to reign with Christ over all creation for all eternity.

Because by faith… that phrase is crucial. A Christian is first and foremost a person who believes in Jesus and affirms all that He accomplished. We accept by faith that He is the Son of God, the promised Christ, the final prophet, priest and king from God. We trust that by His death we are freed from our sin, united to God forever and set to receive the grace-filled blessings that He has promised His people.

A Christian is also one who follows Jesus. We follow His sacrifices by giving our own lives as a living sacrifice. We follow His battle against the evil one by striving against sin and the devil ourselves. We follow our king with the promise that one day we will reign at His side. A Christian is a believer in Christ, a follower of Christ, a little Christ, if you will, and all our hope is in Him.

Thanks for joining me today as I discuss the Heidelberg Catechism. I hope you’ll join me again next week as we look at Lord’s Day 13 together and discuss questions 33 & 34.

Conclusion…

If you want to learn more about Cornerstone Baptist church, you can find us online at Cornerstonewylie.org. You can follow us on Twitter or Instagram @cbcwylie. You can find us on Facebook at facebook.com/cornerstonewylie. You can also subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or google play to stay up to date on all the new content.

Thanks for listening.


[1] Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion Vol 1, Book 2 (pg. 495-6)